Quick Answer: Is The Treaty Of Waitangi Legal?

Who refused the Treaty of Waitangi?

Tāraia NgākutiTāraia Ngākuti, a chief of Ngāti Tamaterā in the Coromandel, was one of many notable chiefs who refused to sign the Treaty of Waitangi.

Tāraia was a famous warrior and may have felt that signing would be beneath him..

Why did the British want to sign the Treaty of Waitangi?

Reasons why chiefs signed the treaty included wanting controls on sales of Māori land to Europeans, and on European settlers. They also wanted to trade with Europeans, and believed the new relationship with Britain would stop fighting between tribes.

Is the Treaty of Waitangi legally binding?

While the Treaty is widely seen as a constitutional document, its status in New Zealand law is less than settled. At the moment, Treaty rights can only be enforced in a court of law when a statute or an Act explicitly refers to the Treaty.

What are the 3 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.

What happened to the Treaty of Waitangi?

What happened after the Treaty was signed? Shortly after the Treaty was signed, Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson proclaimed British sovereignty over the whole of New Zealand. … Under British law, New Zealand became technically a part of the colony of New South Wales.

Why does the Treaty of Waitangi matter?

Why the Treaty is important The Treaty governs the relationship between Māori – the tangata whenua (indigenous people) – and everyone else, and ensures the rights of both Māori and Pakeha (non-Māori) are protected. … requiring the Government to act reasonably and in good faith towards Māori.

Who broke the Treaty of Waitangi?

It may have been practically unknown to the hundreds of thousands of settlers who flooded in to New Zealand to ‘open up’ the country. By the end of the 1870s Māori were outnumbered 10 to one by the European population. Breaches of Māori rights under the treaty escalated as settlement extended across the North Island.

Is New Zealand stolen land?

The New Zealand land confiscations took place during the 1860s to punish the Kingitanga movement for attempting to set up an alternative, Māori, form of government that forbade the selling of land to European settlers. … Much of the land that was never occupied by settlers was later sold by the Crown.

What does HAPU mean?

In Māori and New Zealand English, a hapū (“subtribe”, or “clan”) functions as “the basic political unit within Māori society”.

What is Article 3 of the Treaty of Waitangi?

Article 3. In article 3, the Crown promised to Māori the benefits of royal protection and full citizenship. This text emphasises equality.

Which version of the Treaty of Waitangi is legal?

In any case, the version signed at Waitangi and copied to London in 1840 is the official treaty, and legally there is only one treaty. Under the Treaty of Waitangi Act 1975, which reproduces the treaty in both languages, the Waitangi Tribunal has exclusive authority to determine the meaning and effect of the treaty.

What was the point of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The purpose of the Treaty was to enable the British settlers and the Māori people to live together in New Zealand under a common set of laws or agreements. The Treaty aimed to protect the rights of Māori to keep their land, forests, fisheries and treasures while handing over sovereignty to the English.

Why is the Treaty important?

Treaties form the basis of most parts of modern international law. They serve to satisfy a fundamental need of States to regulate by consent issues of common concern, and thus to bring stability into their mutual relations.

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi still important today?

The Treaty was a contract of respect between the British and Māori. … The Treaty now means there must be respect between Māori and non-Māori. It is important that the laws and rules today consider and respect both Māori and non-Māori ways of living.

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi important in education?

The Treaty of Waitangi principle calls for schools to understand and honour Treaty principles in all actions and decision making. It is about making our country’s bicultural foundations evident in school policies, organisation, physical spaces, whānau and community engagement, and classroom planning and assessment.